Cultural Heritage and Armed conflicts

 

Peut-on protéger les patrimoines de l’humanité de la folie destructrice des hommes? L’héritage culturel peut-il être protégé par les lois? Toutes ces questions seront abordées par un panel d’expert au Centre Culturel du Lycée Français de New York.

 

Specialists of Cultural Heritage and Its Protection Will Discuss Massive Destruction of Sites in the World

In September, 2015, the methodical destruction of the thousand-year-old ancient city of Palmyra in Syria was undertaken by ISIS.All that remains there today are a few anonymous stones on a sand field. Can we prevent wars from destroying our shared heritage of humanity? Can cultural heritage be protected by law? Are international organizations like UNESCO trying hard enough? Is technology part of the solution?

A panel of experts addressed these questions at the Cultural Center of the Lycée Français de New York on December 5, 2016.

With Hugh Eakin, Senior Editor at New York Review of Books with extensive reporting on this issue,  Philippe de Montebello, LFNY alumnus and professor of Art History at NYU’s Institute of History of Fine Arts and former director of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Edouard Planche, a legal expert in the protection of cultural heritage at UNESCO, Salam Al Kuntar, a research fellow at the Penn Museum of the University of Pennsylvania and co-director of the Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq Project and Navina Najat Haydar, curator in The Met’s department of Islamic Art since 1999.

About the panel series

The 21st Century Citizenship Series are panel discussions on the major issues facing our world. Organized in the evening and in English, these panels are free and open to all.

For more information about the upcoming panels, please visit the Lycée Français de New York site.

Can we prevent wars from destroying our shared heritage of humanity? Can cultural heritage be protected by law? Learn more from our distinguished panel of experts at the Cultural Center of the Lycée Français de New York on Monday, December 5.

 

Specialists of Cultural Heritage and Its Protection Will Discuss Massive Destruction of Sites in the World

In September, 2015, the methodical destruction of the thousand-year-old ancient city of Palmyra in Syria was undertaken by ISIS.All that remains there today are a few anonymous stones on a sand field. Can we prevent wars from destroying our shared heritage of humanity? Can cultural heritage be protected by law? Are international organizations like UNESCO trying hard enough? Is technology part of the solution?

A panel of experts addressed these questions at the Cultural Center of the Lycée Français de New York on December 5, 2016.

With Hugh Eakin, Senior Editor at New York Review of Books with extensive reporting on this issue,  Philippe de Montebello, LFNY alumnus and professor of Art History at NYU’s Institute of History of Fine Arts and former director of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Edouard Planche, a legal expert in the protection of cultural heritage at UNESCO, Salam Al Kuntar, a research fellow at the Penn Museum of the University of Pennsylvania and co-director of the Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq Project and Navina Najat Haydar, curator in The Met’s department of Islamic Art since 1999.

About the panel series

The 21st Century Citizenship Series are panel discussions on the major issues facing our world. Organized in the evening and in English, these panels are free and open to all.

For more information about the upcoming panels, please visit the Lycée Français de New York site.

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Pascale Richard

Director of Cultural Events

Pascale Richard
Pascale aims to bring to the Lycée the best of French and American cultures through conferences, concerts, films and various events. In 2012, she launched the Artist-in-Residence program at the LFNY. Her background is in journalism and writing, and before joining the Lycée, Pascale also worked in fundraising at the FIAF. She has been living in New York for the last 15 years.

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