Alive Inside

 

La musique libère l’esprit. Telle est la leçon apprise par un des groupes de dialogue de 4ème1. Inspiré par le documentaire Alive Inside qui traite d’un programme thérapeutique qui fait écouter de la musique aux personnes atteintes de perte de mémoire, le groupe s’est porté volontaire dans une unité spécialisée qui applique ce traitement.

vieille alive-inside-jpg-20140731

© Los Angeles Times

They watched middle-aged and elderly residents who live with Alzheimer’s or other memory-damaging conditions become animated, talkative, and engaged because of the music presented to them in their social room.  There was karaoke, recorded music piped into speakers from smartphones, and a wide variety of percussion instruments.

Music, as the documentary points out, gets processed in parts of the brain that tend to be unaffected by dementia.

This is why, when you tap those neural centers, memories become unleashed – names, dates, colors, anecdotes — and an individual’s former self gets revealed briefly with brightness in the eyes and smiles on faces.  A joyful noise arises.

FullSizeRenderThe advisory group witnessed this again and again while they sang, danced, and beat on percussion instruments with the residents.  That is why, on that mild February morning, they left Coler determined to let more people know about this place and the great need its residents have for music in their lives.

For further information contact:   www.musicandmemory.org, www.aliveinside.org, and at Coler:  Public Affairs Contact, Jose Torres, 212-848-6000.

 

Music frees the mind.  Such is the lesson learned by one of the 4eme1 advisory groups.  Inspired by the documentary Alive Inside, which focuses on Music and Memory, a therapeutic program that brings personalized music to individuals with memory loss, the group volunteered in a memory-loss unit that runs this treatment at a 1000-bed city facility on the northern tip of Roosevelt Island.

vieille alive-inside-jpg-20140731

© Los Angeles Times

They watched middle-aged and elderly residents who live with Alzheimer’s or other memory-damaging conditions become animated, talkative, and engaged because of the music presented to them in their social room.  There was karaoke, recorded music piped into speakers from smartphones, and a wide variety of percussion instruments.

Music, as the documentary points out, gets processed in parts of the brain that tend to be unaffected by dementia.

This is why, when you tap those neural centers, memories become unleashed – names, dates, colors, anecdotes — and an individual’s former self gets revealed briefly with brightness in the eyes and smiles on faces.  A joyful noise arises.

FullSizeRenderThe advisory group witnessed this again and again while they sang, danced, and beat on percussion instruments with the residents.  That is why, on that mild February morning, they left Coler determined to let more people know about this place and the great need its residents have for music in their lives.

For further information contact:   www.musicandmemory.org, www.aliveinside.org, and at Coler:  Public Affairs Contact, Jose Torres, 212-848-6000.

 

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